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Thun S, Halsteinli V & Løvseth LT (2018) BMC Health Services Research 18:407 [Link] BackgroundIt has been shown that a recently defined stressor,...
Rostad IS, Fridner A, Sendén M & Løvseth LT (2017).Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, 7 (2). June [link]   Recurrent international data...
Siller, H., Bader, A., & Hochleitner, M. (2016).In L. R. Gervais & M. P. Millear (Eds.), Exploring Resources, Life-Balance and Well-Being of Women...

Løvseth TL, Fridner A, Jonsdottir LS, Marini M & Linaker OM
Stress & Health (2013)

Concerns about protecting patient’s privacy are experienced as a limitation in the opportunity to obtain and utilize social support by many physicians. As resources of social support can modify the process of burnout, patient confidentiality may increase risk of this syndrome by interfering with proper stress adaptation. This study investigates if experiencing limitations in seeking social support due to confidentiality concerns are associated with burnout. University hospital physicians in four European countries completed measures of burnout, (Index) of Confidentiality as a Barrier for Support (ICBS) and factors of social resources and job demands. Linear regression analysis showed that ICBS was significantly associated with the burnout dimension of Exhaustion and not with Disengagement. These findings were present when controlling for factors known to diminish or increase the likelihood of burnout. These results are the first to demonstrate that patient confidentiality is associated with burnout in the process of stress management among physicians.