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Thun S, Halsteinli V & Løvseth LT (2018) BMC Health Services Research 18:407 [Link] BackgroundIt has been shown that a recently defined stressor,...
Rostad IS, Fridner A, Sendén M & Løvseth LT (2017).Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, 7 (2). June [link]   Recurrent international data...
Siller, H., Bader, A., & Hochleitner, M. (2016).In L. R. Gervais & M. P. Millear (Eds.), Exploring Resources, Life-Balance and Well-Being of Women...

Løvseth LT, Güzey IC, Fridner A, Minucci D & Linaker OM (2014). British Journal of Medicine and Medical Research 4 (27) p 4582-90 DOI : 10.9734/BJMMR/2014/10799

 

Background: For decades there has been a prominent gender gap in the number publications among physicians in academic medicine. Increased recruitment of women into medicine and a new generation work force that emphasize work-life balance can contribute to narrow this gap. Aims: The present study investigates whether younger hospital physicians may display less gender differences in authorship of scientific publications compared to those older of age. Methodology: Baseline cross-sectional survey data among senior consultants (N=1379)working at public university hospitals in three European countries, participating in the HOUPE study (Health and Organization among University hospital Physicians inEurope). Analysis: Chi-square tests and logistic regression analysis with probit link function. Results: There were differences in number of publications based on country where Italy and Sweden reported a significantly higher number of first- or last authorship compared to Norway (Χ2 =30.6, P<.001). Logistic regression analysis confirmed gender differences in number of publications and first-and last authorships (P<.001) across all age categories. The rate of increase in number of publications is higher for men than for women physicians. Conclusion: These findings confirm that scientific production is still more relevant to discuss in terms of gender than generation. It is important to look at factors that are essential to career choice and faculty retention in women in particular but also among women and men in the new generation of physicians.